A New Exercise Training Methods for Untrained Middle-Age Males: Comparison of Effectiveness Resistance Training with Blood Restriction Cuffs vs Traditional Resistance Training

Document Type: Original research papers

Authors

1 Department of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran

2 Department of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran.

Abstract

The American College of Sports Medicine recommends moderate to high load resistance training to improve training adaptations. However, use of moderate to high loads are often not feasible in clinical populations. Blood flow restriction (BFR) training is a simple and practical way for older and middle-aged people to prevent the negative consequences of aging. Thus, this paper documents the design and implementation of a training program to improve adaptations of anabolic hormonal agents and muscle strength induced by resistance training with BFR in middle-aged individuals. In this semi-experimental study design, 20 (age 48.55±2.11 years) untrained middle-aged males were selected. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups: BFR and traditional resistance training (RES). Subjects in the 4-weeks BFR protocols performed knee extension and leg press at 20% 1-RM intensity, and the non-BFR training group performed the same movements at 80% 1-RM intensity. Blood samples were also taken to measure growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1. Levels of GH (P=0.001) and IGF-I (P=0.001) was significantly increased in all groups following the four weeks of resistance training with or without BFR. However, increase of GH concentrations in BFR group were significantly higher than RES group (P= 0.04). Also, there was no different between groups for IGF-I (P=0.54). It seems likely that performing resistance training with BFR during middle age is a good way to delay the adverse effects of aging on anabolic hormonal factors.

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